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20121129
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
of president obama's arrogance could be off the fiscal cliff. he is deeply liberal, deeply ideological, reckless, irresponsible and no interest in seriously negotiating with the republican party and he's now putting partisan politics ahead of what is good for america. even the "washington post" is calling him out saying he has no intention to negotiate. writing: >> sean: let me repeat, the offer lacks any concessions. if you want the most recent concrete evidence of how irresponsible president obama is, you need look no further than his opening bid in budget talks. the proposal awd to republicans late yesterday courtesy of tax cheat geithner calls for the following: 1.6 trillion dollar tax increase, increasing rates on incomes over $250,000. 150 billion dollars in new public stimulus spending of which 50 billion would be spent next year. another extension in unemployment benefits, 30 billion. new power to raise the federal debt limit without congressional approval. in other words, an obama blank cheque. that is not all. he also wants the estate tax to be levied at 45% on inheritances a
. >> you know, the president has warned us about the dangers of going over the fiscal cliff. but his actions have not matched his public statements. members of his own party seem quite comfortable with sending the economy over the fiscal cliff. >> the speaker's remarks riled the left and provoked this response from senate majority leader harry reid. >> he says that democrats have got to get serious about cuts, spending cuts. where is the disconnect, then? >> i don't understand his brain, so you should ask him. okay? >> with only a handful of legislative days left on the congress's calendar before the looming fiscal cliff becomes a raw reality, will the president and house gop find a way over the latest road black and back to the bargaining table? >> why did the white house decide to have this as their opening volley when they knew the response would be a negative one that they drew? >> was it hardball opening? yeah, of course it was. the question is, what's the counteroffer? >> i would imagine there has to -- tim geithner is too smart of a guy in this administration is filled with sm
weeks because he does not think the proposal to avoid a fiscal cliff is serious one. negotiations here are nowhere. another republican, senator lindsey graham thinks he thinks things are heading down hill. >> i think we are going over the cliff. it's clear to me they made a political calculation. the offer doesn't deal with the entitlement reform to save the medicare and medicaid and social security from imminent bankruptcy. it raises $1.6 trillion on job creators to destroy the economy. no spending controls. >> reporter: treasuresy secretary tim geithner advocated for clinton era tax rates and wants top earns to pay 39.6%. he said when that was the rate in the '90s there was was good economic growth and strong private investment. said republicans would rather raise revenue closing the loophole and limiting deduction need the time to realize that might not bring in enough cash. >> that is a good set of propose is and good for the economy. if they have suggestions, they want to go further, lay it out to us. >> secretary geithner said he cannot promise we won't go off the fiscal cliff. s
of what he had to say regarding the fiscal cliff and the threat that looms. let me play it. >> when it comes to raising taxes on the wealthy, those making more than $250,000, if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest. >> so is it a bluff when the obama administration says they're willing to go off the cliff if a deal is not reached on rates? >> i don't think it's a bluff. if you look at the reality of what happens, all the leverage which i -- right now clearly the white house has. they get more leverage if we go over their cliff. you can argue that would not send a good message to the country, to the world. it would prove that we are dysfunctional and cannot govern, et cetera, et cetera. in terms of dealing with the policy problem, which is you have this massive and growing debt, you have to bring in more revenues. there's multiple ways to do it, but critical ways to raise rates on the top end. it was what
address the fiscal cliff. any plan to reduce the deficit should quote start small and then grow very substantially over time. so dudley basically agreeing with the take that sandy is a bigger event, and then you want to add on top of that dudley's concerns about the fiscal cliff coming our way. >> what does this mean for the retailers because right now we have the impact of sandy, because they're confined pretty much to november. we had this seasonally strong period for retail sales especially for the holiday season. but does that mean the kruk -- money is being spent instead on gypsum board and other materials that need to be bought for reconstruction? >> there is a big disconnect here, we had terrific consumer confidence numbers, so i think the nation itself should be stronger. the high income areas, remember, these were high income areas, a lot of times we're used to storms not hitting the high income. but i do think that we're going to see it pushed to 2013. this is not fukushima where they just decided they couldn't rebuild. this is major areas that once we get the materials are
. >> pretty definite. all right, ron. >> thank you, ron. >>> we'll turn now to if fiscal cliff, 30 days from an economy-crippling deadline. yet talks seem to be going nowhere. treasury secretary timothy geithner will be the guest on "this week" with george stephanopoulos. >> last weekend, you sat right here and you said you were reasonably optimistic that a deal could be afoot. in the intervening week, lot of trash-talking from both sides, can we still be somewhat hopeful? >> this week was a rough week in these negotiations. treasury secretary geithner when he went up to capitol hill, mitch mcconnell laughed when they got the offer from geithner. house speaker boehner said that the talks are at a stalemate. democrats said they're not going to make another move until republicans say they're going to go for an increase in tax rates. so, this is stalemate right now. now, these things always look horrible when they come together. more and more voices say, this is going to go over the fiscal cliff at least for a few days in january. >> if we go over the fiscal cliff, voters will likely blame the
heads back to work this morning as the clock is ticking down toward the impending fiscal cliff. talks, though, seem to be at a stalemate. yesterday with just 29 days until tax hikes and deep spending cuts kick in. both republicans and the democrats were running to the airwaves to try to explain their positions. here's what they said. >> what we're not going to do is extend those tax cuts with the wealthiest americans. those cost a trillion dollars over ten years and there's no possibility that we're going to find a way to get our fiscal house in order without those tax rates going back up. >> nobody wants to go over the cliff. that's why the day after the election i tried to speed this process up by making the concession to put revenues on the table. it's unfortunate that the white house has spent three weeks doing basically nothing. >> the administration has presented a plan that calls for $1.6 trillion in new tax revenues. $400 billion in cuts to medicare and other entitlements. $50 billion for a new stimulus and congress would have to give up control over raising the debt limit. re
'll turn now to the fiscal cliff, 30 days from an economy-crippling deadline. where everyone's taxes go up and massive spending cuts kick in. yet, talks seem to be going nowhere. treasury secretary timothy geithner will be the guest on "this week" with george stephanopoulos. george is with us now. good morning, george. >> last weekend, you sat right here and you said that you were reasonably optimistic that a deal could be afoot. in the intervening week, we have seen a lot of trash-talking from both sides, can we still be somewhat hopeful? >> this week was a rough week in these negotiations. treasury secretary geithner when he went up to capitol hill, on thursday, the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell laughed when he got the offer from tim geithner. they think it's an offer that doesn't show any rules towards compromise. house speaker john boehner said that the talks are at a stalemate. there seems to be a huge divide. democrats said they're not going to make another move until republicans clearly say they're going to go for an increase in tax rates. republicans aren't prepared to m
edges closer to going over the fiscal cliff. democrats and republicans cannot agree how to raise revenue and cut spending. on january 1st, as many of you know, taxes go up and doeep spending cuts take effect. the sunday talk shows reflect how far apart they are what we will not do is extend those tax cut force the wealthiest americans. there's no possibility that we will find a way to get our fiscal house in order without those tax rates going back up. >> nobody wants to go over the cliff. that's why the day after the election i tried to speed this process up by making a concession to put revenues on the table. it's unfortunate that the white house has spent three weeks doing basically nothing. >> speaker boehner added he is flabbergasted by the administration's proposals while secretary geithner said he believes a deal can be reached by the end of the year. >>> we could find out this morning if the supreme court will take up the issue of same-sex marriage. at 9:30 eastern, the court releases its orders list. there's a possibility justices will hear cases that challenge the federal defen
, education and housing assistance. as referred to as the fiscal cliff. and when it comes to doing something to avoid it, house speaker john boehner bluntly told reporters today, there is a stalemate. for his part, president obama is trying to break that stalemate by asking voters to put more pressure on the republicans. cnn chief white house correspondent jessica yellin and chief political correspondent gloria borger join us right now. gloria, guess i'll start with you. does the president have any leverage? >> he has a lot of leverage right now. i mean, if you look back to the debt ceiling in the summer of 2011, you recall the president was accused of negotiating with himself because it was sort of a time of weakness for him. right now, look, joe, he's just won re-election. 67% of the american public according to our polls believes that there should be a deal that contains a combination of spending cuts and tax increases. more than half of the american public says, you know what, we'd like the taxes on the wealthy to go up. so he does have public opinion on his side. just been re-elected. s
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)